Resources

Internet Resources

The AMSS is pleased to offer you this guide to assist in your learning.  It's well worth your time, so be sure to check it out in full. Most of these links are available through the University of Adelaide Library, but this is your one-stop-shop for everything you will need!

ClinicalKey

It's the new kid on the block, but that doesn't mean it's not powerful and well resourced. Search clinical eBooks, eJournals, practice guidelines, patient handouts, and cases on a wide area of clinical medicine from specific tabs or from a single unified search engine.

ClinicalKey also provides access to the Australian Medicines Handbook via the "Drugs" tab.

To access ClinicalKey, click here: ClinicalKey Australia

MD Consult

TEXTBOOKS | JOURNALS | DRUGS

A truly excellent source of information, the website is divided into a number of sections accessible by the astutely named tabs at the top of the page. Before buying any textbook check to see if it – or a similar one – is available on MD Consult and reconsider your need to purchase the book.

For example, in 2010, the following core textbooks will be available on MD consult...

Guyton & Hall: Textbook of Medical Physiology, 11th Ed. 2005
Drake: Gray's Anatomy for Students, 2nd Ed. 2009
Young: Wheater's Functional Histology, 5th Ed. 2006

Read below to find out how to access these textbooks online from a university or home computer! Note: MD consult also supports full mobile access for Adelaide students and so it can be accessed from iPhones and other hand-held devices.

TEXTBOOKS

MD Consult is a portal to textbooks from just about every medical speciality. There are far too many books and specialities to mention here; suffice it to say, you would be doing yourself a disservice by not exploring the possibilities yourself. 

Some of the specialities covered by MD Consult include:

  • Cardiovascular
  • Surgery
  • General Medicine (Cecil’s)
  • Gastrointestinal
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Renal Medicine
  • Psychiatry
  • Paediatrics

This is a great resource for PBL (especially for second and third years) and could also come in handy on the wards. 

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto MD Consult via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘MD consult’ in library catalogue
    b. Scroll down and click on ‘MD consult [electronic resource]’
    c. Click on link to e-resource ‘Click here to access (Also available to SAMHS staff)’
    d. Enter your student number and password
    e. Click on the 'books' tab at the top of the page

  2. Search books via one of three methods:
    a. By using the search bar at the top of the page, eg. “Myocardial infarction’
    b. By searching alphabetically or via specialities for book and using the book’s index
    c. By searching alphabetically or via specialities for book and then using the ‘Search This Book’ tool available at the top of the page

JOURNALS

MD Consult also acts as a portal to hundred of full-text journals. The search engine appears much more intuitive than PubMed, so perhaps try searching for journals here first. Or, use this service when trying to find the full text of an article you’ve found somewhere else.

Journals accessible include:

  • The American Journal of Cardiology (full text available from January 2001 – present)
  • Journal of the American College of Surgeons (full text available from 2001 – present)
  • American Family Physician (full text available January 1999 – present)
  • American Heart Journal (full text available January 1995 – present)
  • American Journal of Kidney Disease (full text available 1999 – present)
  • The Lancet Infectious Diseases (full text available January 2001 – present)

Searching for Journal articles can be achieved using one of three search methods:

  1. By searching all ‘Journals/MEDLINE’ for a topic, eg. ‘meningococcal meningitis’
    a. Be sure to notice the ‘date range’ you opt for. Too narrow will result in few correct results while a too broad search could produce outdated information.

  2. By searching a particular journal for a particular topic, eg. Searching ‘The Lancet Infectious Diseases’ for ‘meningococcal meningitis’
    a. By entering the name of the journal into the search bar ‘Journal Name’, or
    b. By selecting the journal from the list on the Journals title page

  3. By searching for a particular article, eg. ‘Fitch, van de Beek. Emergency diagnosis and treatment of adult meningitis’ The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 7 Issue 3 March 2007’
    a. By using the relevant search boxes on the Journals title page.

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto MD Consult via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘MD consult’ in library catalogue
    b. Scroll down and click on ‘MD consult [electronic resource]’
    c. Click on link to e-resource ‘Click here to access (Also available to SAMHS staff)’
    d. Enter your student number and password
    e. Click on the 'journals' tab at the top of the page

  2. Simply select ‘Journals’ if already logged on to MD Consult

  3. Search journals via one of three methods mentioned previously.

DRUGS

Access to information provided by Gold Standard, which provides ‘clinically-based drug information content through an independent, peer-reviewed process’.

This resource usually contains good details on drug mechanisms of action. 

For more information on Gold Standard, visit: www.goldstandard.com

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto MD Consult via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘MD consult’ in library catalogue
    b. Scroll down and click on ‘MD consult [electronic resource]’
    c. Click on link to e-resource ‘Click here to access (Also available to SAMHS staff)’
    d. Enter your student number and password
    e. Click on the 'drugs' tab at the top of the page

  2. Simpy select ‘Drugs’ if already logged on to MD Consult

  3. Search Drugs based on
    a. Drug name
    b. Indications
    c. Contraindications

STAT!Ref

TEXTBOOKS | ANATOMY.TV | STEDMAN'S MEDICAL DICTIONARY

Similar to (but less well known than) MD Consult, STAT!Ref acts as a portal to textbooks, Anatomy TV and Stedman’s Medical Dictionary.

TEXTBOOKS

Including access to two pharmacology texts and the DSM IV-TR of which there is not similar type on MD Consult.

Books available include:

  • ACP (American College of Physicians) Medicine
  • Adams and Victor’s Principles of Neurology, 8th ed. (2005)
  • Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, 10th ed. (2007)
  • Diagnostic and Statistical Manual – Text Revision (DSM IV-TR) (2000)
  • Goodman & Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 11th ed. (2006)

To access click here, or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto STAT!Ref via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘STAT!Ref’ in library catalogue
    b. Click on ‘STAT!Ref [electronic resource]’
    c. Click on Link to e-Resource ‘http://online.statref.com/default.asp?grpalias=Adelaide
    d. Enter your student number and password

  2. Click on ‘Titles’ tab to access textbooks

  3. Search for topic via one of two methods:
    a. By using the search bar at the top of the page, eg. “Myocardial infarction”
    b. By searching alphabetically for book and using the book’s index

ANATOMY.TV

This is a unique took available to Adelaide Uni students. It claims to be “the world’s most detailed 3D model of human anatomy online” and contains detailed computer-generated images of muscles, bones, nerves, arteries and the rest. 

It’s certainly worth checking out, and it may be particularly useful for students preparing for resource or studying for Limb Dissection.

After selection a region of the body to view (eg. ‘interactive hip’), use the ‘dissect up or down’ function to view deeper or more superficial structures, which are organised in layers. Use the arrows at the bottom of the screen to rotate the image. Click on a muscle, nerve, bone or blood vessel to view detailed written information, which will appear in the side bar.

To access click here, or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto STAT!Ref via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘STAT!Ref’ in library catalogue
    b. Click on ‘STAT!Ref [electronic resource]’
    c. Click on Link to e-Resource ‘http://online.statref.com/default.asp?grpalias=Adelaide
    d. Enter your student number and password

  2. Click on ‘Titles’ tab to access textbooks

  3. Search for topic via one of two methods:
    a. By using the search bar at the top of the page, eg. “Myocardial infarction”
    b. By searching alphabetically for book and using the book’s index

  4. click on ‘Resources’ tab

  5. click on ‘anatomy TV’ S

STEDMAN'S MEDICAL DICTIONARY

To access click here, or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto STAT!Ref via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘STAT!Ref’ in library catalogue
    b. Click on ‘STAT!Ref [electronic resource]’
    c. Click on Link to e-Resource ‘http://online.statref.com/default.asp?grpalias=Adelaide
    d. Enter your student number and password

  2. click on ‘Resources’ tab

  3. click on ‘Stedman’s Medical Dictionary'

Emedicine

A great resource for pre-clinical and clinical students alike, Emedicine contains thousands of free articles written by experts, usually from the United States. Students have been known to get through entire PBL sessions with only an Emedicine article, printed moments before the session is to begin, in their hands. It is worth becoming familiar with this excellent resource.

Try searching for a disease (or disease process) straight up (eg. Leukaemia). Make sure you include only Emedicine results, and pay attention to the category of the article (eg. Paediatrics or haematology).

You will need to set up an account to view the content, this is free.

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. Go to www.emedicine.com

  2. Create an account and log in

  3. Search for content via one of two ways:
    a. Use the search bar at the top of the page
    b. Scroll down to view and select medical and surgical specialties

Australian Medicines Handbook (AMH)

The AMH is an independent (not supported by drug companies), evidence-based Australian book containing information on just about every drug an Australian doctor is likely to see. It contains excellent information on dosing, perfect for clinical students.

Mechanisms of action can be a little vague, so you may need to use another source, but it is an excellent resource nonetheless.

To access click here and scroll down to the 'Australian Medicines Handbook' link. Please note that the current subscription to the AMH via the Barr Smith Library only permits one user at any one time, so it is likely that you will not be able to access the resource. However, on the same site as the link provided here, there is a link just below to 'Australian Medicines Handbook via MD Consult'. This gives you access to the AMH via MD Consult and there are unlimited users that can log on at any one time, so if the former option does not work, then this one should.

Harrison's Online

This staple of medical education is available free to students via the library proxy. It is an absolute must see destination and generally offers a good level of detail sufficient for PBL/CBL and knowledge on the wards.

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. log onto Harrison’s Online via Uni of Adelaide library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘Harrison’s Online’ in the library catalogue
    b. Click on ‘Harrison’s Online [electronic resource]’
    c. Clink on Link to e-Resource ‘click here to access’ 
    d. Enter your student number and password

  2. Enter search term in search bar or scroll down to browse chapters

Diagnosaurus

Unknown to many students, Access Medicine also offers differential diagnosis assistance via the ‘Ddx’ tab. Click to browse by symptom, disease, or organ system with helpful hyperlinks to relevant chapters.

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. log onto Harrison’s Online via Uni of Adelaide library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a. Search for ‘Harrison’s Online’ in the library catalogue
    b. Click on ‘Harrison’s Online [electronic resource]’
    c. Clink on Link to e-Resource ‘click here to access’ 
    d. Enter your student number and password

  2. Click on 'Ddx' tab

RACGP Australian Family Physician

This useful resource directed at General Practitioners is available free to anyone on the World Wide Web. It often contains very succinct articles relevant to Australian clinical practice; and, more senior students (3rd year and above) may find this resource particularly helpful. A great place to start for third year PBL/CBL, due to its clinical focus.

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto http://www.racgp.org.au/afp

  2. Enter search term in search bar or view back issues online

Australian Doctor: How to Treat

Another local resource directed at GPs this resource can be of great use to medical students, particularly clinical ones.

To access click here or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto http://www.australiandoctor.com.au/howtotreat.asp

  2. Use your find function (Crtl + F) to search for key words or scroll down to view all articles

UpToDate

Once students start using it, many find that UpToDate is something that they can't live without. It was previously available in the hospitals only, but is now available for all Adelaide university students - which is GREAT news.

UpToDate is quite possibily a clinical student's best friend. It is widely available in the hospitals and it has a knack for containing just the right information you need, when you're desperately searching minutes before a ward round. There's also PLENTY in it for pre-clinical students too.

UPDATE: UpToDate is now accessible from home computers.

To access UpToDate click here, or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto UpToDate via Adelaide Uni Library Proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a) Search for 'UpToDate' in the library catalogue
    b) Click on 'UpToDate online [electronic resource]'
    c) Enter your student number and password
  2. To navigate UpToDate simply type relevant terms in the search field

BestPractice

BMJ Best Practice is a newly available online resource which combines the latest evidence and expert opinion and presents it in a concise fashion. This resource is excellent for exploring differential diagnosis and will be highly useful to clinical students. There is also a drug database that contains hundreds of drugs alphabetically and is especially useful for understanding drugs and their adverse effects.

BMJ Best Practice CAN be used from a home computer.

Note: BMJ Best Practice also supports full mobile access for Adelaide students and so it can be accessed from iPhones and other hand-held devices with an internet connection.

To access BMJ Best Practice click here, or follow these steps:

  1. Log onto BMJ Best Practice via Adelaide Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    a) Search for ‘BMJ Best Practice' in the library catalogue
    b) Click on ‘Best practice [electronic resource] / [publishing director, Rachel Armitage ; editor in chief Charles Young]'
    c) Click on 'click here to access'
    d) Enter your student number and password
  2. To navigate BMJ Best Practice simply type relevant terms into the search field. The drug database tab can be seen at the top of the page.

To discover the full potential of Best Practice you might choose to take the video tour at - http://bestpractice.bmj.com/best-practice/tour.html.

You can also read the "Getting started with Best Practice" flyer at -http://group.bmj.com/products/evidence-centre/bp_getting_started_low_res.pdf.

Perinatal Practice Guidelines

The South Australian Perinatal Practice Guidelines are clinical guidelines established by the Department of Health for the care of obstetric patients in South Australia. These guidelines are used and quoted extensively by clinicians at the Women's and Children's Hospital and are hence a definitive reference for diagnostic and management criteria. The guidelines are also an excellent way to revise for the Human Reproductive Health long case examination and viva.

The guidelines can be accessed at the following link -http://www.health.sa.gov.au/ppg/Default.aspx?tabid=113

To navigate the guidelines you can do the following:

  1. Scroll over the tab called, "Perinatal Practice Guidelines" at the top of the page and view all eight sections of the guidelines (see below). Each section contains chapters such as "Breech Presentation" and "Twin Pregnancy" which are core topics in Human Reproductive Health.
  2. Click on the, "Search" tab at the top of the page and search for relevant terms.

Electronic Therapeutic Guidelines

The Electronic Therapeutic Guidelines (eTGs) comprehensively cover the management of common disorders seen in clinical practice. The guidelines are independent, unbiased and are based on current evidence. The guidelines are revised every 3 to 4 years and represent an up to date resource for medical practitioners seeking to provide optimum, evidence-based therapies.

Although students in clinical years benefit most from use of the eTG, students in Pre-clinical years (particular those in Third Year) may find these to be quite useful, due to the provision of concise, clear instructions for the management of all the important conditions.

The eTGs have recently been made available via mobile device through the University wifi network (eduroam), through this link: http://online.tg.org.au/ip.

Alternatively, via laptop, to access eTG click here and enter your student number and password, or follow these steps:

  • Log onto eTG via Adeliade Uni library proxy at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
  • Navigate to the Library Catalogue via the navigation bar at the top of the page
  • Search for ‘Electronic Therapeutic Guidelines
  • Click on ‘ETG complete [electronic resource]’
  • Click on ‘Access for University of Adelaide staff and students’
  • Enter your student number and password.
  • To navigate eTG simply type the relevant search terms in the search box located in the left sidebar

Australian Institute of Medical Education